Are total deaths increasing in the U.S. from COVID? One study said “no” — then got deleted

The big question that many people are asking now that we're hearing about numbers spiking in the coronavirus pandemic is this: do the number of COVID-related deaths really have an impact on the amount of deaths across the United States?

Well, one Johns Hopkins University scientist did a study on that question and found the answer to be “no.” That study was later retracted, but I'm pretty sure we all know why that happened.

Now, the study's author, Genevieve Briand, said that because we see so many COVID-related deaths it is because deaths related to things like heart disease are still being counted as COVID. There was even an instance where someone was killed on a motorcycle and because they had COVID, that death was marked as “COVID-related.” 

So, despite the numbers seeming bad, we don't see a huge number of deaths related to the virus in general. There are many people that die from the flu and pneumonia each year, unfortunately. All of those lives matter, but in this instance to shut down the economy, ruining small businesses, is not something I think we should be doing.

The study was retracted by Johns Hopkins University's editors, after they said that because they received so many letters saying “thank you for posting this article, I'm no longer wearing a mask” they felt obligated to retract the article so people still adhere to the mask mandates.

I thought we were trusting science, right? If science tells us that the number of deaths across the U.S. hasn't really been impacted by the coronavirus, shouldn't we trust that? Now we have science retracting some of the studies they've done because it doesn't fit the narrative.

We're not dealing with science here, ladies and gentleman. We're dealing with a narrative.