Black Lives Matter close to insolvency as execs take home six to seven figure paychecks

Despite intense scrutiny, BLM GNF persisted in hiring kin of its founder, Patrisse Cullors, and various board members. Paul Cullors, primarily known for his graffiti artistry with no experience in security, held a paid position as 'head of security,' garnering a $126,000 salary on top of his consulting fees.

Black Lives Matter close to insolvency as execs take home six to seven figure paychecks
AP Photo/Brynn Anderson
Remove Ads

Black Lives Matter's (BLM) national establishment faces the specter of bankruptcy, as its finances nosedived to an $8.5 million deficit last year, concurrently awarding multiple employees with salaries in the seven-figure range.

The Washington Free Beacon revealed the precarious financial state of BLM's Global Network Foundation (BLM GNF), a more formal structure for the civil rights movement that officially emerged in November 2020.

Despite intense scrutiny, BLM GNF persisted in hiring kin of its founder, Patrisse Cullors, and various board members. Paul Cullors, primarily known for his graffiti artistry with no experience in security, held a paid position as 'head of security,' garnering a $126,000 salary on top of his consulting fees.

In the wake of Patrisse Cullors' resignation in May 2021, BLM GNF continued to attract controversy with lucrative hiring decisions. Among them, Shalomyah Bowers, who replaced Cullors, saw his consultancy firm amass $1.6 million for management and consulting services in 2022, according to the Free Beacon.

The sister of a board member also earned $1.1 million for “consulting.”

Furthermore, BLM GNF struggled with a loss in investment value of nearly $10 million in the most recent tax year and an 88 percent decrease in donations between 2021 and 2022. Despite such a financial downturn, the group invested over $12 million in opulent properties in Los Angeles and Toronto, arousing widespread consternation.

In the midst of this financial storm, the group's new board of directors, led by nonprofit adviser Cicley Gay, appears to be mired in personal financial issues. Gay, who has been declared bankrupt three times, is now in the hot seat, with the task of reshaping the organization's finances in the wake of public scrutiny.

Fueled by this financial tumult, BLM has vowed to enhance transparency, citing an “internal audit” and “tightening compliance operations” as vital steps forward. Despite the organization's turbulent finances, its resolute commitment to “rebuild trust” and “sustain Black people for generations” remains unwavering. Supposedly.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

  • By Ezra Levant

Help Chris!

Rebel News has set up a crowdfunding campaign for Chris Carbert of the Coutts Four.

Take Action

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads