Feds haven't received ANY correspondence asking for more Internet censorship

Feds haven't received ANY correspondence asking for more Internet censorship
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Stephen Guilbeault's Department of Canadian Heritage and Justin Trudeau's Privy Council Office have received hundreds of pieces of correspondence on the topic of internet censorship, with exactly none of the messages urging the Liberals to do more.

The answer comes from an order paper question submitted by Conservative MP Alex Ruff (Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound).

Here's what Ruff asked:

With regard to correspondence received by the Minister of Canadian Heritage of the Office of the Prime Minister related to internet censorship or increased regulation of posts on social media sites, since January 1, 2019: (a) how many pieces of correspondence were received; and (b) how many pieces of correspondence asked for more internet censorship or regulation?

Canadian Heritage responded that of the 389 pieces of correspondence they received, none asked for more internet censorship or regulation:

(a) The Department of Canadian Heritage's Ministerial Correspondence Secretariat received a total of 389 pieces of correspondence related to internet censorship or increased regulation of posts on social media sites.
(b) The Department of Canadian Heritage's Ministerial Correspondence Secretariat has not received any correspondence asking for more internet censorship or regulation.

The Privy Council Office gave a similar reply:

Since January 1, 2019, the Office of the Prime Minister received 376 pieces of correspondence related to internet censorship or increased regulation of posts on social media. Information concerning the number of pieces of correspondence asking for more internet censorship or regulation is not tracked.

Earlier this week, Guilbeault introduced Bill C-36, which would amend the Criminal Code to allow for house arrest and fines of up to $70,000 for Internet publishers, bloggers, Facebook and Twitter users. The bill would allow jail or monitoring for internet users who might commit “an offence motivated by bias, prejudice or hate” based on their internet writings, regardless of whether they've been convicted of an actual crime.

You can read the order paper response for yourself below.

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