French PM tells Central and Eastern European countries that they either 'accept migrants or pay'

The most controversial aspect of the pact is the provision requiring member states to pay up to €23,000 for every migrant they refuse to accept under the reallocation scheme.

French PM tells Central and Eastern European countries that they either 'accept migrants or pay'
Johanna Geron, Pool via AP
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French Prime Minister Gabriel Attal's recent statement claiming that the EU migration pact will transfer illegal migrants to Central Europe, sparing France, has ignited a firestorm of controversy in Poland. During a television debate, Attal asserted the pact introduces solidarity, forcing eastern countries to either accept migrants or pay.

In response, Jarosław Kaczyński, leader of Poland's conservative Law and Justice (PiS) party, announced plans to call for an emergency meeting of the Polish parliament to address Attal's remarks, Remix News reported.

Kaczyński highlighted the apparent contradiction between Attal's statement and Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk's claim that the migration pact will not affect Poland due to its acceptance of Ukrainian refugees. "It seems that Tusk once again is saying one thing in the EU and another in Poland," Kaczyński said.

Conservatives in Hungary and Poland have long warned the recently passed EU migration pact was a ploy to transfer unwanted migrants to their countries, despite Western claims that increased migration and diversity are always beneficial. Senior PiS MEP Jacek Saryusz-Wolski labeled the pact "a pump for migrants from Africa" and the Middle East, suggesting it will be seen as an invitation to come to Europe.

Saryusz-Wolski also cited EU Commissioner for Home Affairs Ylva Johansson's admission that Europe needs 4.5 million migrants annually "to bridge the demographic gap, change society and provide the left with future voters."

Poland, along with Hungary and Slovakia, voted against the EU migration pact at a session of the Council of the European Union. Kaczyński and PiS have consistently argued that the decision should be made by the European Council, where all decisions must be unanimous. The most controversial aspect of the pact is the provision requiring member states to pay up to €23,000 for every migrant they refuse to accept under the reallocation scheme.

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