Islamic extremist Youtuber Nabil Absi stormed Mass in Quebec Catholic Church and performed Islamic prayers

Absi, a French national, notes on his Facebook account that he was on a recent trip to Canada, visiting Montreal.

Islamic extremist Youtuber Nabil Absi stormed Mass in Quebec Catholic Church and performed Islamic prayers
X/ @CatholicArena
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Video taken of the incident and posted to X by Catholic Arena shows Absi, cloaked in traditional Muslim garb, approaching the altar as the priest was in mid-Liturgy of the Eucharistic prayer as parishioners stood and offered the sign of the cross.

Absi then rolled out his prayer mat and faced East, then knelt and recited Islamic prayers before standing up and walking out of the church. The location and name of the church are not noted in the video, and evidence of the bigoted performance has been scrubbed from Absi's YouTube account. He has 285,000 subscribers.

Absi, a French national, notes on his Facebook account that he was on a recent trip to Canada, visiting Montreal.

In the video shared by Catholic Arena, the priest or congregants did not stop Absi.

The eucharistic prayer occurs before Communion and includes epiclesis, in which Catholics believe the bread and wine are consecrated as Christ's body and blood in the presence of the Holy Spirit. This may explain why the congregation and priest did not react to Absi's intrusion into Mass at what is considered a holy moment.

The stunt has drawn condemnation online from members of the Canadian parliament. Conservative MP Michael Barrett noted the act could be criminal.

Section 176.2 of the Canadian Criminal Code prohibits the interruption of a religious gathering.

Former Liberal MP, now independent Kevin Vuong, said the incident made a case for a reinstatement of the Office of Religious Freedom, a Conservative initiative the Liberal government did away with shortly after taking power in 2015.

In March 2022, four men were convicted in the Islamic State murder of a Catholic priest in France.

The men were sentenced to between eight years and life for aiding in the attack on 85-year-old Father Jacques Hamel in his church in 2016. Two nuns and an elderly couple were held hostage before the terrorist slashed the priest’s throat and nearly killed another elderly churchgoer.

The two attackers, Abdel Malik Petitjean and Adel Kermiche, both 19, were killed by police as they left the church.

Four other men - Rachid Kassim, Jean-Philippe Steven Jean-Louis, Farid Khelil and Yassine Sebaihia - were convicted in a French court for their role in the plot.

Kassim, a Frenchman and Islamic State recruiter was given life in prison, although he is believed to have been killed in a drone strike in 2017 in Iraq.

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