Israeli doctor reports psychological trauma in freed Hamas hostages

'I can tell you that on behalf of all the medical and psychological teams treating those who return, the mental states we encountered have no precedent in medical literature. We feel that we have to rewrite the textbooks of post-trauma,' says Dr. Renana Eitan.

Israeli doctor reports psychological trauma in freed Hamas hostages
Fox News
Remove Ads

A doctor in Israel treating individuals previously held captive by Hamas reports that the survivors are experiencing "extremely severe psychological abuse" from captivity.

"I can tell you that on behalf of all the medical and psychological teams treating those who return, the mental states we encountered have no precedent in medical literature. We feel that we have to rewrite the textbooks of post-trauma," Dr. Renana Eitan told "Sunday Night in America."

Eitan disclosed that the Tel Aviv Medical Center is currently providing care to over 15 ex-hostages, detailing their experience of intense physical and psychological abuse.

"Those held captive were subject to starvation, to beating, to sexual abuse. They were being held in inhumane sanitary conditions. Extremely severe psychological abuse was inflicted on them, including separation from family members, separation of siblings, separation of children from their mothers. They were held in solitary confinement and spent long days in total darkness until they developed severe hallucinations," Eitan claimed.

"Children were forced to watch brutal videos. They were under constant threats by weapons and threats to harm them even after they were released. They refer to the forced use of psychiatric drugs and other substances," she added.

Eitan further explained instances where individuals, despite seeming physically unharmed, are grappling with "severe post-traumatic symptoms."

"Some of the home comers, they look happy, they look fine, they look physically fine, and we try to hold on to those optimistic signs, but still, even those who seem fine, we know that most of them [are] suffering from severe post-traumatic symptoms, they have painful, traumatic memories. And they are entering into dissociative states, where for a moment they feel as if they are still in captivity and only later do they return to the understanding that they have been released," she said.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads