Nearly two-thirds of Canadians do not support delaying elections for MP pensions: poll

The Liberal government has proposed legislation to move the next scheduled election from October 20 to October 27, 2025. This change would make 80 additional MPs eligible to collect a pension.

Nearly two-thirds of Canadians do not support delaying elections for MP pensions: poll
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The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF), in association with Leger, released a poll showing that 63% of Canadians oppose delaying elections by one week, which would allow for dozens of MPs to be eligible for pensions.

“The poll is clear: the vast majority of Canadians don’t want the government delaying the election so dozens of extra MPs can take pensions,” said Franco Terrazzano, CTF federal director. “All MPs should listen to Canadians and oppose this pension trickery.”

The Liberal government has proposed legislation to move the next scheduled election from October 20 to October 27, 2025. This change would make 80 additional MPs eligible to collect a pension.

A Leger poll asked Canadians whether they support or oppose delaying the election by a week and thereby allowing dozens of additional MPs to qualify for pensions. The poll results show 47% strongly oppose, 17% somewhat oppose, 10% somewhat support, 6% strongly support, and 21% don’t know.

"Among those who are decided on the issue, 80% of Canadians oppose delaying the election to trigger additional MP pensions," the CTF writes.

The additional pensions could amount to as much as $120 million over a lifetime if all 80 MPs were to lose their seats. The annual starting pension for these MPs ranges from $32,000 to $49,000.

“Canadians are struggling, so MPs shouldn’t rig the system so more politicians can collect lucrative, taxpayer-funded pensions,” Terrazzano said. “If politicians don’t want to look shady, then they shouldn’t do shady things like this.”

The Trudeau Liberals sneakily introduced a tweak to the Elections Act in March that allows permit for dozens to receive a taxpayer-funded pension.

Public Safety Minister Dominic LeBlanc proposed to move the next election day from October 20, 2025, to October 27. It also expanded advanced voting and streamlined the process to mail-in ballots.

LeBlanc's spokesperson, Jean-Sébastien Comeau, claimed the legislative change had nothing to do with pensions.

“The amendments to the Canada Elections Act that we introduced are aimed first and foremost at maximizing voter participation and protecting the integrity of federal elections,” Comeau penned to the National Post.

LeBlanc said the bill would strengthen Canada's democracy but justified the proposed legislative change to accommodate Hindus observing Diwali on October 20.

He made no mention of the taxpayer-funded pension for dozens more MPs by moving election day.

“Our government believes that a strong democracy begins with enabling all Canadians to freely exercise their fundamental right to choose their representatives and we’ll always be there to defend that right,” the minister told reporters.

To qualify for a pension, elected representatives must serve in elected office for at least six years. Those elected in 2019 would surpass that cut-off on October 27, 2025.

Among those MPs include 32 Conservatives, followed by 22 Liberal MPs, 20 from the Bloc Québécois and six New Democrats.

MPs can receive reduced pensions at the age of 55 with full pensions paid out at 65. Those who do not qualify are refunded their pension contributions.

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