Poverty report card shows worsening situation for Canadians as food banks reach breaking point

'When you look at big numbers like that, you forget that it's real people behind those numbers. These are families, these are kids who go to school without anything in their lunchboxes,' said Kirstin Beardsley of Food Banks Canada.

Poverty report card shows worsening situation for Canadians as food banks reach breaking point
Remove Ads

A new report shows that food insecurity and poverty are only getting worse across Canada.

The report outlines how the Trudeau Liberals are not adequately responding to the crisis, with Food Banks Canada's annual poverty report card showing that one in four Canadians have unstable or inadequate access to food.

Forty-four percent of Canadians say they are worse off this year financially compared to a year ago.

"When you look at big numbers like that, you forget that it's real people behind those numbers. These are families, these are kids who go to school without anything in their lunchboxes," said Kirstin Beardsley of Food Banks Canada to the Globe and Mail.

Food insecurity has increased in all 10 provinces, says the report. Saskatchewan saw the highest increase, with an increase of 7.7 percent, from 20.3 percent to 28 percent.

Food bank visits have become much more common, having increased by 50 percent since 2021, Beardsley said. "If we see these rates of growth continue, I can tell you that food banks will get to a point where they're not able to serve the need," she said.

The poverty report card is a report that assigns letter grades to each government in Canada, which currently shows that governments are not acting sufficiently. Ottawa received a D-, down from D last year.

Most provincial governments also got D grades.

Calgary Food Bank President and CEO Melissa From said that numbers have exceeded the 600-households-per-day threshold.

“We never imagined that we were going to be at a point where we’d be feeding 650-700 households a day, but here we are,” she said to Global News.

She said that clients vary much more in socioeconomic status than they once did, with clients now being "working folks" doing "everything right."

“They have a job. They’re paying their mortgages. They’re doing all these things right and they can’t make ends meet? We feel so powerless in that.”

The Food Bank says it has had to ramp up its services to meet the increasing demand.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads