Quebec Police advise against posting images of mail thieves due to privacy concerns, Montrealers react

On the streets of Montreal, a prevalent sentiment is that victims should have the right to publicize footage capturing individuals stealing their property.

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Canada, and particularly the city of Montreal, is grappling with a surge in mail theft, from perpetrators sometimes referred to as ‘Porch Pirates’.

A CTV News report indicates that one in four Canadians have experienced package theft on their property. In response, provincial police tried to discouraged citizens from sharing surveillance images of presumed thieves, citing potential privacy violations.

This statement has triggered a wave of online reactions, with many expressing disagreement with the Quebec provincial police.

On the streets of Montreal, a prevalent sentiment is that victims should have the right to publicize footage capturing individuals stealing their property.

One resident voiced his disagreement with the police, stating, "When it comes to privacy violations regarding theft, I disagree. They should put it on Facebook, they should put it everywhere, so at least it would probably stop the scourge of theft."

Highlighting the apparent shortage of police officers, another citizen remarked, "The police in Quebec can't be everywhere; they can't do much about it. And people lose a lot of money, and companies too, so I consider that these videos should just be published."

A woman reflected on the irony of a thief claiming privacy invasion, stating, "At first, I find it a bit silly for the citizen who has their package stolen. But how would the person stealing the package want to come back later and say, 'Well, now you're invading my privacy'?"

Some residents argue that publishing such images serves a purpose, emphasizing security concerns and providing warnings to others. When questioned about the preference for online exposure over involving the police, one respondent explained, "First, to show our security and it's also a way to warn others."

Expressing frustration with perceived police inaction, a man asserted, "Logically, that's what the police should do. Stop sitting in their cars, doing nothing, and going around in circles," pointing to a perceived lack of assistance in addressing such minor crimes.

Another individual passing by described it as "self-justice, vengeance, you say I have the power to harm this person."

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