Scholastic encourages teachers to 'disrupt the status quo' with LGBT books for Pride Month

The children's book publisher is promoting LGBT literature for all ages.

Scholastic encourages teachers to 'disrupt the status quo' with LGBT books for Pride Month
Chelsea Purgahn/Tyler Morning Telegraph via AP
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Scholastic, the renowned children's book publishing company, is urging teachers to "disrupt the status quo" by introducing LGBT books to children during Pride Month. In its recently released 2024 guide for the annual "Read With Pride" initiative, Scholastic asserts that educators and caregivers "absolutely know queer children" in their classrooms, libraries, and communities, regardless of whether these children are out to themselves or others.

“Books and literature are never neutral; by engaging with queer literature for children and young adults, you are disrupting the status quo that implies being cisgender, heterosexual, and allosexual are the default. You are showing children an expanded way of thinking and being that validates all children and all people,” the guide begins, the Daily Wire reported

Scholastic argues that this exposure validates all children and expands their ways of thinking and being.

Scholastic's recommendations include LGBT books for children as young as preschool age, such as "My Moms Love Me" and "You Are Loved," which feature families with same-sex parents. For older children ages eight to 12, the guide suggests several books, including three by author Alex Gino that explore themes of transgender and non-binary identities.

The guide also includes resources for supporting LGBT youth and books, such as The Trevor Project, a nonprofit that aims to prevent LGBT youth suicides. However, The Trevor Project has faced criticism for its model school policy that encourages schools to conceal suicidal students' sexual orientation and gender identity from their parents without the student's permission.

Scholastic's 2024 guide dedicates significant attention to the claim that affirming children's new gender identities helps prevent suicides, citing The Trevor Project heavily. However, recent studies have called into question the effectiveness of social transition in improving children's and teens' mental health.

“As a teacher, librarian, educator, or caregiver, how you interact with all children and teens around queerness matters,” Scholastic’s guide states. “What literature you provide them with, and how you talk about both literature and identity, can have an immense, life-changing impact on the young people in your life.”

Scholastic maintains that everyone benefits from books with authentic representation of queer identities.

“Everyone benefits from books with authentic representation of queer identities,” the guide states. 

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