Treasury Board President Anita Anand responds to Rebel News' question about ‘green slush fund’ scandal

After the conference, we went to Nathan Philips Square in downtown Toronto to find out if everyday Torontonians think the government’s net-zero goals are feasible, and whether tax-paying Canadians or government actors making record profits are the true beneficiaries.

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Yesterday, Rebel News attended the Canada Green Building Council’s annual Building Lasting Change (BLC) conference, where President of the Treasury Board of Canada Anita Anand announced the next steps in reaching the federal government’s stated goal of net-zero carbon emissions by the year 2050.

Minister Anand announced that Crown corporations must align with the commitment to net-zero emissions by 2050 and be “climate-resilient” in their operations. Interim greenhouse gas emissions targets are now in place for national safety and security fleets such as aircraft, marine vessels and tactical land vehicles. The government will also build net-zero carbon buildings, buy clean electricity, continue to purchase electric vehicles, lower the amount of carbon in construction materials and expand the low-carbon field procurement program for carbon renewal.

A federal cleantech agency called Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) involved with many of these greening initiatives has recently been found by Auditor General Karen Hogan to have “serious governance issues” with one in six projects being inelligibly funded. The SDTC funding responsibilities are now being transferred to the National Research Council (NRC) over the next year as a result of these conflict of interest concerns.

“The various reviews conducted ― including the Auditor General’s report ― have revealed serious weaknesses in SDTC’s governance, prompting a new delivery approach to government support for the cleantech sector,” Innovation Minister François-Philippe Champagne told the National Post.

Minister Anand appears to potentially have a conflict of interest in this “green slush fund,” with her husband’s company being chosen over 18 competitors to be awarded millions of dollars in contracts from the government, according to a Blacklock's report.

Following her announcements, we questioned Minister Anand:

The Globe and Mail reports that the government is breaking its own laws, giving huge contracts to Liberal insiders like McKinsey without an open tendering contest. Will you call in the RCMP fraud investigators, or do you expect Canadians to trust the Liberals to investigate the Liberals giving cash to Liberals?

The Minister responded:

The work of the Auditor General is extremely important. She provided a report this week which outlined a number of recommendations, and she specifically said that the rules that are in place are sufficient, the rules need to be followed. And so we accept all of the recommendations of the Auditor General's report, and we encourage all public servants to adhere to them. And I will say that as president of the Treasury Board and the minister that is responsible for promulgating the rules and the policies and directives, I underscore with a double underline how important it is for public servants to adhere to the rules that we have in place. Thank you.

After the conference, we went to Nathan Philips Square in downtown Toronto to find out if everyday Torontonians think the government’s net-zero goals are feasible, and whether tax-paying Canadians or government actors making record profits are the true beneficiaries.

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