Saskatchewan appoints Chief Firearms Officer, pledges defence of property rights

On Sunday, the Saskatchewan Firearms Office (SFO) named former Estevan police chief Murray Cowan as its new Chief Firearms Officer effective April 1. 'I will be dedicated to upholding the rights and safety of legal firearm owners in our province,' he said.

Saskatchewan appoints Chief Firearms Officer, pledges defence of property rights
Remove Ads

The province of Saskatchewan has expanded its firearms office amid its pledge to protect property rights while keeping residents safe from violent gun crime.

On Sunday, the Saskatchewan Firearms Office (SFO) named former Estevan police chief Murray Cowan as its new Chief Firearms Officer effective April 1. He replaces Robert Freberg, who now serves as the Saskatchewan Firearms Commissioner.

Cowan, a veteran with more than 40 years' experience in public safety, will oversee the SFO’s central administration and report to Freberg, who will advocate and advance government priorities in his new role with the organization. He retired from the Estevan police force on January 23.

“Mr. Cowan’s track record speaks volumes about his dedication to representing the interests of our firearms community,” said Public Safety Minister Paul Merriman. “With his expertise, we are confident in our shared mission to promote safe and responsible firearm practices across our province,” he added.

“I will be dedicated to upholding the rights and safety of legal firearm owners in our province,” added Cowan.

Sunday’s announcement builds upon the passing of the Saskatchewan Firearms Act last April, when the province moved to protect the property rights of lawful gun owners while maintaining the safety of the public.

"It is important for Saskatchewan to have its own provincial firearms legislation to ensure the concerns of responsible firearms owners are taken into account," then-Public Safety Minister Christine Tell told reporters at the time.

The bill aims to put roadblocks in place for Ottawa’s controversial ‘buyback’ scheme that is slated to resume later this year. 

It mandates provincial licensing for seizure agents, while committing to "fair compensation for any firearms being seized." Police officers are exempt if firearm seizures are a part of their regular policing duties.

Law-abiding gun owners received a two-year extension on federal confiscation last year until late-2025 after dialogue with stakeholders fell through.

Freberg called the legislation critical to their work in bolstering public safety and assisting law enforcement with crimes committed by an illegal firearm.

The province dedicated $8.9 million to the Firearms Office in Budget 2023.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

  • By Sheila Gunn Reid

Help cover our reporting on firearms!

$10,310.00 Raised
Goal: $15,000.00

Donate

PETITION: Hands Off Our Guns

36,823 signatures
Goal: 100,000 Signatures

Add signature

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads