Canada spent $464 million in Ukrainian foreign aid — with little oversight

Canada spent $464 million in Ukrainian foreign aid with little oversight

An audit of the management of Canadian humanitarian spending in Ukraine concluded that nearly a half a billion dollars in aid was spent without a metric of success over the course of nine years.

The Evaluation Of Canadian International Assistance Programming In Ukraine report found a “lack of coherence in planning ... lack of an explicit long term vision on sustainability” and no measure of long term results.

“Without a common performance framework, Canada’s overall progress towards overall outcomes within the country was difficult to reinforce”

According to a new report by Blacklock’s Reporter:

Parliament increased foreign aid to the country following Russians’ 2014 annexation of Crimea. Aid grew from $18 million in 2010 to as much as $106 million in 2015. Grants over nine years totaled $464 million.

Funding included a $900,000 grant to the National Bank of Ukraine, “sales and marketing” subsidies for farm co-operatives, support for free legal aid and programs for juvenile delinquents, and police training.

“Ukraine has made slow economic progress in recent years and remains one of the poorest countries in Europe,” said the Evaluation.

The audit also established the Canadian embassy in Ukraine used Foreign Affairs funds to hire a “gender equality advisor” to help in “promoting gender equality in Ukraine” and that men milking cows was touted as a feminist victory won with Canadian foreign aid dollars:

“Gender equality was well integrated in development programming and led to good results; Support to family farms impacted gender roles. Men participated in milk farm activities, traditionally considered a women’s activity.”

According to a 2016 national census, Ukrainian-Canadians number 1,359,655, or 3.8 per cent of the country's population, and are mainly Canadian-born citizens. The majority of Ukrainian-Canadians reside in the prairies.