Public Health Agency orders a rush delivery of 50 MILLION syringes

Public Health Agency orders a rush delivery of 50 MILLION syringes

Dr. Theresa Tam’s Public Health Agency of Canada is requiring a rush order of 50 million syringes. 

According to a Notice of Proposed Procurement (NPP) first posted October 22, 2020 and amended on October 23 on the Federal Public Works website, Buyandsell.gc.ca: 

Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) Emergency Services Depot has a requirement for supply and delivery of 1ml Syringes for COVID-19. The Syringes must be made in accordance with specifications listed in the Request for Proposal. These items will be delivered to three main locations across the country; Toronto, Montréal, and/or the Calgary area.

The winning bidder is required to deliver the first 15 million units of the single-use syringes by January 31, 2021, and the remaining 35 million units on or before March 31, 2021. The tender for the medical supplies closes on October 30, 2020.

The Public Health Agency of Canada was recently given $782.8 million in federal funding for medical countermeasures to fight COVID-19

“This funding will help secure and enhance domestic biomanufacturing capacity, including for bulk manufacturing, filling of vials and packaging; to obtain a sufficient supply of packaging materials for the COVID-19 vaccine; to secure mass vaccination equipment and to build capacity for successful vaccine deployment” 

Friday, Prime Minister Trudeau announced a $176 million deal to buy 76 million doses of a plant-based COVID-19 vaccine being developed in Quebec City by biotechnology firm Medicago. The Canadian government now has six advance purchase agreements for 358 million COVID-19 vaccine doses - including 4 contracts with American biotech firms

A seventh deal for 44 million in federal funding was inked with a Chinese firm, CanSino Biologics in May. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau endorsed the deal even though CanSino is funded by Beijing and is producing its vaccine with the People’s Liberation Army. The vaccine is being tested on Chinese soldiers. The deal fell apart in August after the Chinese government changed the rules on vaccine exports resulting in months-long delays on delivery for Canadian testing. 

Public Services and Procurement Minister Anita Anand, when asked whether her government would continuing pursuing deals with China, told iPolitics that the feds “are pursuing all fronts for vaccine development and research.”