The Globe and Mail prints Chinese Communist Party propaganda

Many journalists and politicians were upset over the past weekend about The Globe and Mail printing a full, two-page propaganda piece for the Chinese Communist government.

In it, you'll find a whole heap of praise on China's markets, forestry, agriculture and even how great their schools are. At the bottom of the page, you'll see this written:

Content Produced By China Daily and Distributed in the Globe and Mail” essentially marking it as an ad.


'China Watch' is a name commonly used in these features promoted by the CCP

China Daily just so happens to be the official publicity department of the Chinese Communist Party.

While The Globe is often particularly tough on China, China Daily has a circulation of 600,000 internationally and has boosted that by nearly 50% with this ad.

Not the first time Chinese ads were run by a news outlet

Should Canadian outlets take advertising dollars from a communist country? That's more of an ethical question than a legal one, right now.

Other newspapers take ad dollars from the 'red giant' often; China Daily has purchased almost $20 million in print ads in the U.S., most notably in the Washington Post and Wall Street Journal.

Private companies, like it or not, can give ad space to whomever they like; however, it is our government (where it matters) that does not set a good example when it comes to China.

Health Minister Hajdu refuses to condemn Chinese response

To this day, Canada's Health Minister Patty Hajdu refuses to condemn China's mishandling of the virus.

When asked recently whether or not she regrets calling China's under-reporting of their numbers and the severity of the virus a conspiracy, Hajdu once again defended the nation, remarking that it is hard for anyone to keep track of numbers during a pandemic.

It's time to put tough questions to our politicians about China, about the virus and about the lockdowns.

Few journalists seem willing to ask out of fear of being barred from press galleries and question periods... a sad sign of the times for Canadian journalism.