Historic marker for 19th century Catholic bishop rejected in decision citing his promotion of the Catholic Church

Justin Trudeau’s Liberals rejected a historic commemorative plaque for a 19th century Newfoundland bishop after a federal panel concluded his objective was to “grow the Catholic Church.”

This is part of a broader trend plaguing liberal Canada. Victoria, British Columbia pulled down a statue of Canada's first prime minister John MacDonald, and Halifax pulled down the statue of that city’s founder, Edward Cornwallis after neither of the men was able to pass today's current SJW litmus tests retroactively from beyond the grave.

Blacklocks Reporter has the full story on Bishop Thomas Mullock behind their paywall.

“Then-Parks Minister Catherine McKenna in a memo last June 5 endorsed the refusal by the Historic Sites and Monuments Board to honour Bishop John Thomas Mullock as a “national historic person”.

Sponsors sought recognition of Bishop Mullock, a builder of the Basilica of St. John the Baptist in St. John’s. Mullock died in 1869. Under the Historic Sites And Monuments Act people deemed of national historic significance are honored with a bronze plaque.

Board members concluded Mullock “created a cradle-to-grave system of Irish Catholic institutions” in Newfoundland. “He directed an ambitious program of churches, convents, schools and an episcopal library in St. John’s,” wrote staff. “He also oversaw completion of the monumental Basilica of St. John the Baptist, including the decoration of its interior with an extensive collection of Irish and European artworks that serve as defining symbols of Irish Catholic identity in Newfoundland.”

Mullock built schools, hospitals and social net where there was none and preserved Irish history and culture in NL. Sounds good. I think we can spare a plaque. They give those things out for anything anyway.

Wait! what? He was Catholic. Oh nevermind then!

The Board felt that while Mullock led an ambitious building program, he was part of a succession of ecclesiastic leaders in St. John’s whose objective was to grow the Catholic Church in Newfoundland,” wrote staff. “The Board did not recommend John Thomas Mullock for designation as a national historic person.”

Isn’t that the objective of every religious leader everywhere, to grow their faith? Why is it suddenly offensive when a Catholic does it?

Why is it that Christians and men from bygone eras must be judged by today's standards of tolerance, as opposed to recognizing they were complex products of the times in which they lived? The good things they did still matter today.