Analyzing whether the Conservative Party can mend fences and rebuild its base

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Most credible analyses of the recent federal election demonstrate that the vote split on the right account for a loss of about two dozen seats for the Conservative Party of Canada.

Amanda Connolly and David Akin in the Canadian Press wrote:

The PPC failed to win any seats in the Sept. 20 election, but gathered 5.1 per cent of the popular vote — up from 1.6 per cent in the 2019 federal election.

In 21 ridings across the country, the size of the PPC vote was greater than the number of votes by which the Conservative candidate lost that riding: 12 in Ontario, five in B.C., two in Alberta, one in Quebec and one in Newfoundland.

Fourteen of those losses were to Liberals, while six went to the NDP and one to the Bloc Quebecois.

According to Jack Fonseca in Lifesite:

O’Toole’s Liberal-lite platform also resulted in a massive drop in the popular vote for the Conservative Party.

In 2019 under Andrew Scheer’s leadership, Conservatives won 6,239,227 of the popular vote. Although numbers are not yet finalized, as of this writing, the O’Toole Conservatives received only 5,529,272 of the popular vote. That means O’Toole presided over a collapse of almost 710,000 votes.

The flip-flopping by O'Toole on key Conservative issues drove voters into the arms of the PPC or just demoralized them enough to stay home.

One of those key conservative issues was the carbon tax. After years of opposing one, the Conservatives want to embrace one of their own, but call it something else: a levy. It didn't fool anyone, except maybe O'Toole himself.

Joining me tonight to discuss how Conservatives can fix their climate policy and mend some fences with the disaffected base is Tom Harris of the International Climate Science Coalition Canada.

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