Assault rifles are long, have six bullets, and have a range of four city blocks?

For many law-abiding citizens in Canada the “Assault Weapons Ban” is simply a case of government overreach taking away freedoms from everyday people. 

While our neighbours to the south scoff at anything in the realm of what can be considered an encroachment on their Second Amendment rights, Canadians have, and seemingly will continue to, allow many restrictions to be put on firearms usage and personal protection. 

Notifying authorities about transporting weapons, registering firearms and restrictions on “assault weapons” are just a few of the many regulations put on the books for Canadians to adhere to. However, if any of the above were to happen in the United States it would be considered a breach of civil liberties. 

While Canada's assault weapons ban is simply a list of weapons, the U.S. once had its own ban under the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994.

This Act included a restriction on ammunition magazines that were described as “large capacity" and certain semi-automatic firearms that were defined as assault weapons.

In contrast, Canada's laws are rather lazy.

As there is no legal definition of “assault rifles” or “assault weapons” in Canada, the solution was to simply prohibit weapons by name, fitting no specific description. 

How can this be? Most aren't sure; there isn't much to draw from the legislation as it seemingly is a list of weapons a group of politicians found to be particularly dangerous, scary or “unsuitable” for citizens to own.

Rebel News has set up a petition at HandsOffOurGuns.ca to send a message to Canada's leaders; at the very least, the delivery of the petition to elected officials can send a message that Canadians are unhappy with this random attack on law-abiding citizens' rights.