“Global warming” rebrands again: Ocean Acidification!

The coronavirus pandemic must be over since the Left is back to scolding society about C02.

However, since climate change isn’t doing to us what environmentalists said it would do, the theory is undergoing yet ANOTHER rebrand.  

Remember when it was first called global cooling?

Then it was called global warming just a few years later. However, global warming went on a two decade long hiatus even though there were more people on earth, burning more fossil fuels than ever before. So then it became climate change, but that didn’t really happen either when the climate didn't really drastically shift compared to historical records.

Thinking in their feet, some environmentalists started calling their reason to tax us, make energy more expensive, and all-around control our lives “global weirding”. It was a neat sleight of hand that served two purposes.

The first is that the name appealed to kids, and secondarily, the term allowed the green left to blame any and all unusual weather on your SUV.

Blizzard? Global weirding.

Hurricane? Global weirding strikes again!

Except, extreme weather, despite the 24-hour news cycle making it seem otherwise, is actually on the decline and fewer people are killed by it.That 12-year doomsday clock has about 10 years left on the ticker, or 6 months, depending on how you measure it. We are about to find out just how wrong the environmentalist movement is, yet again.

Time to think fast, Greenies! It’s time for another rebrand and desperate explanation for why we aren’t all dead on a boiling planet: ocean acidification.

Apparently, the ocean is bearing the brunt of our comfortable, first-world lifestyles, being forced to soak up more C02 so the inert gaseous plant food doesn’t linger in the atmosphere warming up the globe.

Is your practical car and cheap electricity making the oceans more acidic, killing the flora and fauna of the murky deeps?

My guest tonight is Tom Harris of the International Climate Science Coalition and he explains why the ocean and humanity are far more resilient than the tax and spend green movement insists.