NYC school cancels classes to house migrants during severe weather

'This is f*cked up,' Rob, a local resident said. 'It’s a litmus test. They are using a storm, a legitimate situation, where they are testing this out. I guarantee you they’ll be here for the entire summer.'

NYC school cancels classes to house migrants during severe weather
Benny Polatseck/Mayoral Photography Office via AP
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Students at a Brooklyn high school were removed from their classroom to accommodate almost 2,000 evacuees from a controversial tent shelter, as a severe storm approached New York City.

In response to worries that a large migrant tent at Floyd Bennett Field might be destroyed by heavy rain and strong winds, the city relocated these individuals to the second-floor gym of James Madison High School, located five miles away, the New York Post reports.

Neighbors of the school were unhappy with the last-minute decision.

“This is f*cked up,” Rob, a local resident said. “It’s a litmus test. They are using a storm, a legitimate situation, where they are testing this out. I guarantee you they’ll be here for the entire summer."

“There’s 1,900 people getting thrown into my neighborhood, half a block from where I live and we don’t know who they are,” he added. “They’re not vetted. A lot of them have criminal records and backgrounds and we don’t even know.”

An angry mother lashed out at the migrants as they arrived in a convoy of school buses amid heavy rain, just before 6 p.m.

“How do you feel? Does it feel good?” the woman, shouted at the buses. “How does it feel that you kicked all the kids out of school tomorrow? Does it feel good? I hope you feel good. I hope you will sleep very well tonight!”

Another local said, “How do you feel stealing American tax money?”

Earlier in the day, the school had posted online that Wednesday's classes would be conducted remotely because the school was being used as a temporary overnight shelter for the migrants.

City officials made the decision to evacuate the migrants from the field due to concerns about the safety of the tent city, with predictions of heavy rainfall and winds reaching speeds of up to 70 mph expected later on Tuesday and continuing into Wednesday.

“To be clear, this relocation is a proactive measure being taken out of an abundance of caution to ensure the safety and well-being of individuals working and living at the center,” City Hall spokeswoman Kayla Mamelak said.

“The families are already in the process of being temporarily relocated and will continue to be provided with essential services and support,” she added. “The relocation will continue until any weather conditions that may arise have stabilized and the facility is once again fit for living.”

By noon, authorities were already preparing the high school for the arrival of migrants from an airfield about five miles away, with 10 NYPD vehicles and about six Emergency Management trucks stationed outside.

Gym teacher Robyn Levy, outside the school, shared, "They informed us that everything had to be cleared out by 5 p.m. They sent us the email at 6 in the morning. I don’t know when we’ll be able to go back."

Levy also expressed her confusion and frustration, questioning, "Why choose this location? Why not relocate them to a place where students' education wouldn't be interrupted?"

The relocation of migrants commenced just before 5 p.m., with over two dozen school buses lined up at the field for the brief journey to the school.

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