Pro-terror group Samidoun is banned in Germany—why not in Canada?

The group was banned to send 'a clear signal that we will not tolerate any kind of glorification or support for Hamas' barbaric terror against Israel,' German Interior Minister Nancy Faeser said.

Pro-terror group Samidoun is banned in Germany—why not in Canada?
The Canadian Press / Spencer Colby
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In November of last year, German security authorities executed raids against Hamas supporters and an organization known as the Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network, which is banned from operating in the country.

The group was banned to send "a clear signal that we will not tolerate any kind of glorification or support for Hamas' barbaric terror against Israel," German Interior Minister Nancy Faeser said.

So why doesn't Canada do the same? That's the question being asked by Terry Glavin in the National Post.

The group is behind several protests across Canada, and is closely associated with the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, a pro-Palestine Marxist-Leninist revolutionary organization founded in the sixties. The group is best known for suicide bombings and airline hijackings.

Based in Vancouver, Samidoun has held the status of a federally registered not-for-profit corporation in Canada since March 3, 2021. This designation came just three days after Israeli Defence Minister Benjamin Gantz classified Samidoun as a terrorist organization.

“We are very concerned,” Israeli Ambassador Iddo Moed said to The Post. “Samidoun is known to be directly linked to the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, which is already a listed terrorist organization. They have been inciting and glorifying terrorist attacks and massacres since October 7, Saturday morning. They were already hanging signs from bridges in Vancouver. This is a serious source of concern.”

In Germany, open support for Hamas is punished, compared to in Canada where protesters have openly chanted in support of the murder of Israelis.

Supporters of Hamas in Germany held impromptu gatherings after the October 7 attacks, widely interpreted as glorifying the event. Chancellor Olaf Scholz condemned these celebrations, expressing his dismay. Subsequently, the German government took decisive action, prohibiting all activities associated with Hamas and Samidoun.

In an official statement, the Interior Ministry outlined the rationale behind the ban: "Samidoun is an international network that spreads anti-Israel and anti-Jewish propaganda under the guise of a 'solidarity organization' on behalf of prisoners in various countries."

Meanwhile, protesters in Ottawa can march and have confidence that there will be no consequences when they chant "long live October 7," and Deputy Prime Minister Chrystia Freeland feels hesitant to condemn it, having to first make sure she sees video of the event.

Trudeau responded by saying, “It is unconscionable to glorify the antisemitic violence and murder perpetrated by Hamas on October 7th. This rhetoric has no place in Canada. None.”

Although glorifying terrorism is not explicitly prohibited by Canadian law, engaging in activities on behalf of, at the direction of, or in association with a designated terrorist group is a criminal offense under Section 83.05(1)(b) of the Criminal Code.

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