Transgender “woman” convicted of sexual assault was focus of legislature plea for taxpayer funding of “gender-confirming garments”

January 29, 2020

A Nova Scotia transgender “woman” has been convicted of sexually assaulting her continuing care assistant.

Dartmouth resident Sherri (Sherry) Dawn Barrett, 45, is six feet tall and weighed 200lb at the time of the June 7, 2018 assault which took place at Barrett's home.

The identity of the CCA is protected under a publication ban, but the court heard that the 4'9" 27-year-old was “slapped on her buttocks” by Barrett, who told her:

“You're pretty, I just want to keep you in my pocket, I want to keep you here forever.”

Later, Barrett hugged and attempted to kiss the CCA while she finished her paperwork before picking her up, even after the CCA told Barrett “no, this is unprofessional”:

[The defendant] headed down the hallway, and while leaning down to get her book bag, Ms. Barrett grabbed her by the buttocks and lifted [the defendant] up. Ms. Barrett then asked for a hug and [the defendant] admits having said “sure” – knowing that her next step was to leave, never to return.

Court documents show that Barrett denies the allegation and even accused the CCA of propositioning Barrett for sex.

Back in October 10 2017, Sherri Dawn Barrett was cited in the Nova Scotia Legislature by NDP MLA Susan Leblanc as one of the poor transgender souls suffering because of the province's lack of funding for transgender individuals, stating that:

Barrett is a woman who is currently awaiting gender confirmation surgery. One of the conditions of her treatment is that she lives, prior to the surgery, in a way that she hopes to live after it, which includes dressing in appropriate clothing. Ms. Barrett is also an Employment Support and Income Assistance (ESIA) recipient. When she brought a request to an ESIA caseworker with a note from a doctor, she was told that the things she needed were not medical necessities, leaving Ms. Barrett's treatment in jeopardy. My question for the Minister of Health and Wellness is, if gender-confirming garments are prescribed by a physician as a prerequisite treatment for gender confirmation surgery, why are they not included in the provincial formulary.

Benefits available in Nova Scotia's Pharmacare Programs are updated monthly in the Provincial Formulary and cover a range of medications and devices.

Speaker Randy Delorey answered:

“...unfortunately, not all services or all required materials, be they prescriptions, are covered by the formulary that are all possible items.”

Services currently offered to transgender patients on the taxpayers's dime are “gender affirming” surgeries including the removal of uteri, ovaries, testicles, penises and female breasts, as well as breast augmentation and the construction of fake penises and fake vaginas.


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