Polygamist book that author says portrays "slightly extreme" liberal values assigned to 8 year olds

A book promoting a four-parent polygamist, dual homosexual family has been distributed to children in the Grade 3 class of Bragg Creek Elementary School in Alberta.

The Lotterys Plus One by Emma Donoghue features a three-year-old transsexual child, and language that left parents of 8-year-old students mortified.

According to the Alberta Ministry of Education, “the book is not an Alberta Education recommended or authorized resource.” It is not clear who authorized teacher Sarah MacFarquhar-Sudar to use the disturbing text in class.

The character foil, and antagonist to the ultra-progressive family, is an old man with dementia who is too “conservative” to appreciate the family structure. The ailing dementia patient is belittled throughout the story with the characters insisting the disease has caused him to “lose his marbles.”

The book — which is recommended by Scholastic for middle school students rather than the early elementary school students who were having it read to them verbally — uses language that child groomers would have found appealing, such as some excerpts below:

Sumac goes upstairs and through the dads’ open door. “Budge up, make room,” PopCorn cries. “Sh.” PapaDum beckons her into the bed, where Brian and Oak are already curled up like puppies between the dads’ big bodies.

This passage goes on to describe the “stinky” odour of a father, and how good the three-year-old transsexual girl “Brian” smells in comparison.

The author also uses graphic and detailed descriptions of the clothing “Brian” wears:

Brian, in nothing but tiny swim shorts and a plastic medieval breastplate, is helping [his mom garden]”

After I arrived in Bragg Creek with a camera crew, the school announced to concerned parents that the book was being pulled from the classroom, conceding that it was not appropriate for the children.

The book appears to have circulated through the school since its publication, and it is not clear how many students were exposed to it.

The Government of Alberta was unable to say if the book was being used elsewhere in the province.