BC NDP premier says take a bike, public transit after Alberta plates vandalized

Albertans like to spend time and money in B.C.; however, since the coronavirus virus hit, along with the pandemic of fear infecting many people, some people in B.C. have been less than neighbourly to Alberta visitors. 

Some angry British Columbia Karens, probably after watching too much CBC, have been attacking cars with Wildrose country license plates, and treating Albertans like a bunch of typhoid Mary's in oil company coveralls.

The Abbotsford News detailed how one B.C. man with the misfortune of an Alberta plate experienced vandalism. The Trail Times reports on another.

But British Columbia's New Democrat Premier Horgan knows how to fix this problem of Alberta and other drivers being targeted for vandalism: Just ride a bike, I guess from the other side of the Rockies.

CP24 carried the bizarre press conference:

Horgan also suggested Monday that drivers switch to B.C. plates to avoid pointed questions from residents who are concerned about the spread of COVID-19.

“I would suggest, perhaps, public transit,” he said at a news conference. “I would suggest that they get their plates changed. I would suggest they ride a bike.”

Horgan said he can't tell people how to respond when seeing different licence plates, but judging people by where their vehicle is registered does not often tell a complete story.

“We don't know why they would continue to have plates that are not consistent with B.C. and we should act accordingly,” he said."

This is so absolutely perfectly BC NDP. It’s like it was made with an NDP jargon generator computer program. How are tourists supposed to change their plates or ride a bike to B.C.?

Even though Horgan is a wet noodle who wants Albertans to haul our campers with e-bikes across the Great Divide — and who won’t tell people that keys go in ignitions and not across paint jobs — the people of Invermere and Radium aren’t scared to welcome Alberta tourists back.

Invermere, B.C.'s Mayor Al Miller even had a message for the provinces eastern neighbours:

Every business on this street is dependent on tourism. And without it, we would not be the town that we are. We welcome Alberta. We like Alberta. So we want to make sure that that's loud and clear: Alberta, we love you.