Cancel culture comes for Paw Patrol

Cancel culture comes for Paw Patrol

As anti-police protests escalate across the United States, cancel culture has finally come for media that in any way depicts police officers in a positive light. Following the cancellation of Cops and Live PD, the culture war has finally come for the children’s cartoon series Paw Patrol.   

According to the New York Times, it was only a matter of time before protesters, adamant that police represent all things bad in the world, would come for the beloved children’s series that depicts a group of dogs as police officers.  

The team includes a firefighting dalmatian, a bulldog construction worker, and a German shepherd named Chase, who’s the show’s lead character.  

Calls for the show’s cancellation follow the official Twitter account’s call for “black voices to be heard”—the kind of virtue signal that every other billion dollar corporation, brand, and internet personality has put out in the wake of the George Floyd protests. 

What followed were replies to the post, including “Euthanize the dog,” and “Defund the paw patrol.” Not even children’s cartoons are safe from cancellation, it seems. 

As the NY Times points out, efforts to defund, dismantle, or otherwise abolish the police include abolishing any positive depictions of police. Police are either all good, or all bad—and the only way to get rid of the police is to enshrine the idea that any form of policing is not simply unnecessary, but also oppressive.  

Calls to cancel shows like Paw Patrol aren’t simply coming from the outside. TV producer Tom Scharpling, who served as the executive producer for the cop show Monk wrote 

“If you — as I have — worked on a TV show or movie in which police are portrayed as lovable goofballs, you have contributed to the larger acceptance that cops are implicitly the good guys.” 

Paw Patrol seems harmless enough, and that’s the point: The movement rests on understanding that cops do plenty of harm,” writes the New York Times