CDC guidelines prepare children, parents for “sudden emergency sleepovers” at schools

CDC guidelines prepare children, parents for “sudden emergency sleepovers” at schools

Children in North America are already facing a new school year filled with masks, pods, social distancing and an immense amount of fear. Now, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has released “Easy as ABC: Three steps to protect your child during emergencies in the school day.”

Bizarrely, this information package gives parents “necessary” information on how to prepare their children for a “sudden emergency sleepover” at their schools.

The “ABC’s” in the CDC guidelines include:

“ASK how you would be reunited with your child in an emergency or evacuation”

“BRING extra medications, special food, or supplies your child would need if you were separated overnight”

“COMPLETE a backpack card and tuck one in your child’s backpack and your wallet.”

Preparing children and parents for the potential “need” for children to stay overnight at their schools is beyond excessive, especially at a time when worries are already heightened.

The CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) have continually failed their missions during the COVID-19 crisis, yet insist on increasing their overreach into matters of personal health and parental authority.

Although “Easy As ABC” isn’t directly tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, the information has been added to the CDC’s "Healthy Schools" website and is nicely nestled under their "BAM! Body and Mind Classroom Resources for Teachers" category.

Why does the CDC want to prepare parents for their children to be left in the hands of their teachers, and what does the CDC know that we don’t?