Public Health was proud of Canada's pre-COVID mask stockpile: Memo

Three months before the coronavirus first emerged as a deadly disease in Wuhan, Theresa Tam's Public Health Agency was patting itself on the back about their own preparedness while unknowingly sitting on millions of expired medical masks and gowns.

Blacklock's Reporter has the story:

The Public Health Agency in a 2019 internal memo boasted it was fully prepared for a pandemic after spending millions stocking federal warehouses. The memo was dated last September 16, three months before the coronavirus was first detected in Wuhan, China.

The Agency in its briefing note National Emergency Strategic Stockpile said it was so prepared all rush orders for masks and other supplies could be filled in a day. “The target timeline to deploy assets is within 24 hours,” wrote staff.

The censored five-page report claimed the Agency was alert to “pandemic preparedness” with adequate stocks of ventilators and “enhanced personal protective equipment” including masks, gloves and disposable gowns. The Agency had spent $79 million to stock warehouses, it said.

Who knows what the Public Health Agency really spent that nearly $80 million on.

Back in April, the CBC reported Tam's empire of expired PPE:

The government of Canada threw out two million N95 masks and 440,000 medical gloves when it shut down an emergency stockpile warehouse in Regina.

A spokesperson for the Public Health Agency of Canada, which oversees the stockpile, said in an email that the masks and gloves had been purchased in 2009 and “had passed the limit of five years for their use, as recommended by the manufacturer.” The masks expired in 2014.

Thank God, the virus wasn’t the plague we all worried it might be. The Wuhan flu is as effective at killing the young and healthy as the Public Health Agency is at doing its job.