Glen Carritt is running for mayor of Innisfail, Alberta

A small town municipal politician in Alberta has resigned in protest after his council slammed him for standing up for small businesses.

Remember the Battle of Innisfail? Black Lives Matter activists were trucked in from Calgary and Edmonton to protest Innisfail, a sleepy farming and oilpatch community a little over an hour north of Calgary. But there was no precipitating incident for the invasion. What brought the radicals there was their own bigotry against rural people — that they just had to be racist, bigots or yokels. They do vote conservative, after all.

Keean Bexte was there on hand to tell the side of the story of the residents who welcome newcomers and didn’t appreciate the slander from people who needed google maps and a free ride to invade their charming hometown. The libel against the townspeople also went largely unopposed by town council who were too scared of the CBC, BLM and Antifa to stand up for the people who put them in office.

Except for one man, a man who is a familiar face to Rebel viewers.

Glen Carritt, who co-organized the United We Roll convoy to Ottawa, is a small business owner in Innisfail. He is also a town councillor in Innisfail. He spoke out against the Antifa/BLM lies about his town then. And he is speaking out for his town again, now.

Glen has given open support to small businesses that are engaging in civil disobedience of the Alberta government closures of whole sectors of the economy — including Bladez 2 Fadez, the barbershop owned by the late, great Ralph Klein’s niece. Klein re-opened her barbershop on Tuesday morning in defiance of the lockdown of personal care services.

Glen has faced harsh criticism for this, accused of encouraging law breaking and lawlessness by his colleagues.

So Glen resigned in protest and he is running for mayor of Innisfail. He joins me tonight to tell me why standing with the business people in his town was more important than his council salary.