EXCLUSIVE: CBC's flattering coverage of violent illegal migrant was far from reality

For part one of this story, click here.

In 2017, a female border guard at the Emerson, Manitoba point of entry was assaulted by an illegal migrant, Ahmed Aden Ali.

Originally from Somalia, Ali was trying to claim asylum in Canada after paying a taxi to take him from Minneapolis to the Canadian border. He’d been fleeing a life of crime in the United States.

CBC's article explains some of the details about Ali’s border troubles:

Ali had landed immigrant status but didn't become a U.S. citizen — he lost his status after being convicted of grand theft auto and other misdemeanours in 2010 and 2013. Ali served his time, but was then sent to immigration detention. He was eventually released on a deportation order.

Ali was taken into custody at Emerson after the border guards became aware of his history of crime and deemed him unlikely to appear at his first immigration review board hearing.

That’s when chaos erupted — violence and vandalism resulting in Ali being charged with two counts of uttering threats, mischief over $5,000, and assaulting a peace officer. Ali then spent two weeks in Headingley Correctional Centre and the Winnipeg Remand Centre before being released on bail.

At the time, Ali was an alcoholic, on social assistance and living in a Winnipeg shelter. But CBC wanted us to believe he was a changed man. In their article, they portrayed Ali as a victim.

Ali was eventually deported in 2018 after the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada found his previous criminality in America made him inadmissible to the country, but I knew there had to be more to the story than the CBC let on.

Three years ago, I filed for access to information on what happened in Emerson, and I’ve just now received 300 pages of exclusive Border Services Agency documents that tell the full story of Ahmed Aden Ali.

Internal emails obtained exclusively by me detail what Ali did in his cell upon detention. At a number of points during his detention, he broke the sprinkler in his cell, charged towards officers and forced them to flee his cell, yelled threats, assaulted a female guard, even set toilet paper on fire. And that’s just the start of it!

Included in the documents were the officers written reports and notes from the night of the assault. Ali wanted the officers to “come in here”, was pacing back and forth with a clenched fist, swearing. An officer wrote that Ali “immediately charged at the door and officer” and “kicked the door saying f*ck you.”

Another officer noted that “I quickly closed the door and I locked it before [Ali] could open the door and attack officer,” and that Ali, “continued to kick the door, violently and repeatedly,” kicking the “cell door with so much force that the key to the cell fell out onto the floor numerous times.”

At one point, Ali came to the window of his cell and told an officer “I'm going to f*cking kill you.” One officer wrote that Ali threatened to kill another female officer, screaming “you f*cking b*tch I'm going to kill you.”

CBC tried to plead Ali’s case to the public, turning him into a victim. It took Rebel News years, but we did what CBC couldn’t do — got the facts right.

Ali was violent before he came to Canada and that didn’t change when he arrived at our border.

While it took three years, it was worth it. And I couldn’t have done it without the support of Rebel viewers like you who always want the real story.

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