Controversial Montreal imam avoids charges after calling for God to 'take care' of Israelis

Quebec Premier Francois Legault called for the police to further investigate the matter, calling the comments a 'clear' incitement 'to hatred, to violence.'

Controversial Montreal imam avoids charges after calling for God to 'take care' of Israelis
The Canadian Press / Paul Chiasson
Remove Ads

No charges will be laid against Montreal Imam Adil Charkaoui after he said that he prays that God will "take care" of Israelis.

The comments were made at a speech in November. Charkaoui was investigated by the RCMP's Integrated National Security Enforcement Team, which sent the file to the Quebec Directeur des pousuites criminelles et penales (DPCP) which decided that charges would not be laid.

The DPCP said in a statement that "after a rigorous analysis of the available evidence … it does not reveal the commission of a criminal offence."

A complaint was filed with Montreal police on November 6, who then referred the case to the RCMP.

Quebec Premier Francois Legault called for the police to further investigate the matter, calling the comments a "clear" incitement "to hatred, to violence."

According to the Criminal Code, public incitement of hatred is defined as making a statement in a public setting that "incites hatred against any identifiable group where such incitement is likely to lead to a breach of the peace."

Three criminal prosecutors reviewed the complaint, who then concluded that "the evidence does not prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the words spoken constitute incitement to hatred against an identifiable group within the meaning of the applicable provision of the Criminal Code, as interpreted by the courts."

"It is not the role of the DPCP to pronounce on the social acceptability of public speech, but rather to determine whether a criminal act has been committed. Given the independence of the DPCP from political considerations, the decision not to lay charges cannot be interpreted as taking a position in the current socio-political context," the statement reads.

According to Le Devoir, Charkaoui only became a citizen a decade ago, having been born in Morocco.

He was accused of being a sleeper agent for al-Qaeda and arrested in 2003, and would have to fight security certificates issued against him by the then-immigration minister calling for his deportation. He sucessfully did so and invalidated the certificates in 2007 and 2009, respectively.

From 2013 to 2015, approximately ten young Quebec residents, influenced by the teachings of Charkaoui, departed for Syria or made attempts to do so during the civil war. Concerned parents subsequently raised concerns about the influence Charkaoui had over their children.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads