Information commissioner's office recommends criminal investigations after record destruction

The Globe and Mail states, 'Canada’s information laws are supposed to punish public servants that wrongfully keep information secret. But when it comes to laying charges, watchdogs find those laws have no teeth.'

Information commissioner's office recommends criminal investigations after record destruction
The Canadian Press / Justin Tang
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The Office of Caroline Maynard has referred seven cases for investigation or criminal referral, according to records previously released in response to an access request and information.

However, no charges have ever been laid.

Reporting by The Globe and Mail's Tom Cardoso and Robyn Doolittle on the findings has noted the lack of consequences faced by bureaucrats who break Canada's access filing regulations.

"Canada’s information laws are supposed to punish public servants that wrongfully keep information secret. But when it comes to laying charges, watchdogs find those laws have no teeth," stated the Globe.

Rebel News routinely experiences years-long delays in access filings. One recent document on the RCMP's efforts to find a new sidearm was five years overdue.

Frequent delays of up to a year and a half are commonplace when Rebel News files for access to documents.

To support Rebel News' access to information efforts to make Trudeau keep his promise to be more open and transparent, make a donation at www.RebelInvestigates.com.

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