Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel smuggles illegal immigrants into Canada: report

According to Radio-Canada, the RCMP received a five-page document detailing how Mexican cartels and 'organized criminal groups' to the south have established a stronger foothold in Canada.

Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel smuggles illegal immigrants into Canada: report
AP Photo/Jorge Barrera, File
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Mexico’s Sinaloa cartel has expanded its ‘very active’ human smuggling operation to the U.S.-Canadian border, according to Radio-Canada

In December 2022, Alex and Daniela — migrants from Colombia — experienced firsthand the horrors of the cartel during their perilous journey to Canada.

After losing an eye from a violent altercation with a Colombian gang in Chile, Alex and his family fled the country in July for North America, arriving by way of Roxham Road — an unofficial point of entry since closed by the Canadian government.

With limited resources, the family had to bribe law enforcement officials in Mexico three times until they employed a human smuggler to reach the American border at $340 per person.

Alex told Radio-Canada he regrets this decision, as it added to his family’s misfortune.

In the Mexican state of Sonora, the cartel forced entire busloads of illegal immigrants from the Americas — and of Indian and Arab descent — into vans, demanding $240 per person to guarantee their freedom.

Alex did not have the money at the time, so one criminal suggested he leave him his son Camilo — an offer he declined.

“I'll let you continue, but I'll keep your boy. With me, he can grow up and become a very good shooter, even a great killer,” he said.

After repeated refusals on the offer, the cartel repeatedly assaulted Daniela for not accepting their offer. They managed to scrummage $4,800 from family in Colombia and Chile to secure their release.

Under coercion, the Colombian family had to thank the Sinaloa cartel by video before fleeing to the U.S. and later Canada.

Each family member then received a secret code given by a smuggler to enter the U.S. that operatives along the U.S.-Canada border would corroborate.

On September 26, the RCMP told Rebel News that despite the federal closure of Roxham Road on March 24, human smuggling remains an issue along the U.S.-Canada border.

“It has been conveyed that the Mexican cartels are in human smuggling operations in Canada,” confirmed RCMP spokesperson Sergeant Charles Poirier.

“Although we have information that the Mexican cartels are in Canada, and are operating, we don’t know if they’re behind all the human smuggling operations,” he said.

In April, U.S. Secretary to the Department of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas passed confidential information to then-public security minister Marco Mendicino concerning cross-border crime.

According to Radio-Canada, the RCMP received a five-page document detailing how Mexican cartels and “organized criminal groups” to the south have established a stronger foothold in Canada.

The document's author said it is “very likely” that smuggler networks would expand their operations and provide shelter, transport and fraudulent documents for illegal immigrants to enter Canada.

As first reported by Radio-Canada, criminal entities have established migration routes for illegal immigrants to enter Canada and the U.S. under a shroud of secrecy. These networks also smuggle contraband into the country through these routes, such as drugs, tobacco and firearms.

RCMP officers at Roxham Road said illegal immigrants take a minibus for the long drive north to Roxham Road, where most receive accommodation on the taxpayers' dime.

Poirier told Rebel News the federal police service “have investigations ongoing that are looking into these organized networks.”

According to data from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection, 70 of the 100 people caught illegally crossing from Manitoba into North Dakota or Minnesota between last October and March 2023 were Mexican. 

In recent months, U.S. border agents have apprehended over 6,100 people in the past year alone — more than their combined total from the previous decade.

With the number of illegal immigrants entering Canada by land falling precipitously since March, thousands more now arrive by air, mainly at the airports in Toronto and Montreal.

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