New York City initiates eviction policy for migrants in shelters

City officials implement case-by-case approach to manage influx of nearly 200,000 migrants since 2022.

New York City initiates eviction policy for migrants in shelters
AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey
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New York City began implementing its latest eviction policy on Wednesday, which aims to remove migrants from shelters who have been in the city's system for 30 days in most cases, or 60 days for young adults between the ages of 18 and 23.

The policy follows a settlement reached between Mayor Eric Adams and migrant advocacy groups regarding the city's "right to shelter" law, as the city needed a way to manage the nearly 200,000 migrants who have arrived since 2022, according to NBC News.

City officials are examining each migrant's case individually, as some may be entitled to extensions based on their circumstances, such as high school students nearing graduation, individuals recovering from medical procedures, or those with upcoming immigration hearings. The policy is expected to impact approximately 250 migrants between Wednesday and Sunday.

Camille Joseph-Varlack, Mayor Adams' chief of staff, told NBC News, "With more than 65,800 migrants still in our care, and as we continue to manage the arrival of hundreds of new migrants requesting shelter in New York City every day, we have begun implementing the next phase of our settlement. While these changes will require some adaptation, they will help migrants take the next steps in their journeys, reduce the significant strain on our shelter system, and enable us to continue providing essential services to all New Yorkers."

The new limits do not apply to migrant families with young children, who can reapply for shelter after being out of the system for 60 days. The city plans to persistently remind migrants of their expected departure date upon checking into the shelter system, provide a second notice after 15 days, offer guidelines for extension applications, and assist with exit planning to facilitate the transition.

Critics have argued that the new policy is inhumane, as it forces people onto the streets during the summer months, according to Fox 5 New York. However, Mayor Adams responded by stating that the policy would always be considered inhumane, regardless of the season, given the challenges of housing the massive influx of migrants.

"People said it's inhumane to put people out during the wintertime, so now they say it's inhumane to do it in the summertime. It's humane to do it in the springtime. It's humane to do in the fall time," Adams said. "It's always inhumane to have to not be able to house 198,000 people."

The evictions come amidst soaring crime rates and an overburdened shelter system initially designed to support the city's homeless population. Last week alone, New York City saw the arrival of 1,300 new migrants, further straining the city's resources.

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