World Boxing Council recognizes female boxer for refusing fight against transgender opponent

This acknowledgment underscored the WBC's commitment to prioritizing the safety of female athletes in the realm of professional boxing.

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Canadian boxer Katia Bissonnette shared her compelling story in our first interview, detailing her decision to refuse a match against a transgender opponent.

Bissonnette's resolute choice to cancel the fight just before entering the ring resonated far beyond the boxing community, capturing the attention of mainstream and independent media outlets.

The prestigious World Boxing Council (WBC) swiftly recognized Bissonnette's stand, with President Mauricio Sulaiman presenting her with a significant medal. This acknowledgment underscored the WBC's commitment to prioritizing the safety of female athletes in the realm of professional boxing.

Boxing Canada acknowledged the lack of regulation regarding issues related to transgender individuals in the competition, stating that a new category needs to be taken into consideration.

Bissonnette shared insights into her discussions with the WBC, stating, "I hope that with this, other boxing federations will follow suit because it would be simple; everything has been highlighted by the WBC."

Addressing concerns about transparency from Boxing Canada, Bissonnette remarked, "It's difficult to know what they [Boxing Canada] think. I really feel like they're trying to keep it quiet, as they have done since the registration of my opponent began."

In a plea for acknowledgment and accountability, Bissonnette expressed, "I would like them to acknowledge that there is an issue, that they made a mistake. I think that's the foundation." While discussing her commitment to the sport despite stepping away from professional competitions, Bissonnette asserted, "I prefer to be cancelled than to lose my life. I want to stay in my position, regardless of what others think."

Her commitment to continuing her boxing journey outside the professional realm until clear regulations are established reflects the broader call for standardized measures to ensure the safety and integrity of women's sports globally.

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