Bill Gates predicts less severe Omicron could see COVID treated like seasonal flu

Gates predicted that the spread of the much more transmissible Omicron variant “will create a lot of immunity, at least for the next year.”

Bill Gates predicts less severe Omicron could see COVID treated like seasonal flu
Jeff J Mitchell/Pool Photo via AP
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Microsoft founder Bill Gates, who has actively promoted the development and widespread adoption of vaccines to treat the coronavirus, says that he fully expects COVID-19 to become more like the seasonal flu after the Omicron variant passes.

Gates, who has spent billions of dollars fighting malaria in Africa and funding the development of vaccines for use in developing countries, says that it won’t be long before mankind is in the clear and the pandemic passes.

“As countries experience their Omicron wave health systems will be challenged. Most of the severe cases will be unvaccinated people. Once Omicron goes through a country then the rest of the year should see far fewer cases so COVID can be treated more like seasonal flu,” Gates wrote on Twitter during a live-tweeted interview with Devi Sridhar, chairman of global public health at the University of Edinburgh.

Gates predicted that the spread of the much more transmissible Omicron variant “will create a lot of immunity, at least for the next year.”

He reasoned that if enough people contract the variant or receive the vaccine, thus having antibodies, the circulation of the virus could slow long enough to end the ongoing epidemic.

As previously reported by Rebel News, Omicron is a much “milder” variant than the Delta variant.

On Tuesday, health officials reported that Omicron now accounts for an estimated 98 per cent of COVID-related cases in the United States. Indeed, nearly all cases of COVID in the U.S. are of the Omicron variant.

All signs are pointing to decreasing infections as the spread is expected to peak in the next few weeks.

As detailed by the Daily Mail, cases rose by 27 per cent since January 3, and deaths rose this week by 12 per cent over the same period according to an analysis of Johns Hopkins University data.

While cases are certainly triple that of the numbers in 2020, the number of deaths has declined disproportionately to the number of cases, indicating that Omicron isn’t having anywhere as severe an impact on hospitalized patients.

“The thing that might happen in the future is you may see the emergence of a new variant that is less severe, and ultimately, in the long term, what happens is COVID becomes endemic and you have a less severe version. It’s very similar to the common cold that we’ve lived with for many years,” said Dr. Mike Tildesley on Times Radio on Saturday.

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  • By Ezra Levant

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