New Brunswick town bans Halloween, province only has one active COVID case

New Brunswick town bans Halloween, province only has one active COVID case

At least one New Brunswick town is banning trick-or-treating this Halloween, citing COVID-19 fears — despite the province having only one active case.

Woodstock, New Brunswick, a quaint town with a population of just over 5,000, has announced that trick-or-treating will be banned this year, after the town council passed a resolution not to allow it.

In response, the city of Saint John’s mayor, Don Darling, stated that he wasn’t sure if “municipalities even had the power” to ban such festivities, although Jean Bertin, a communications officer for the Executive Council Office of New Brunswick, said municipalities do have the power to "set rules out in a bylaw surrounding Halloween.”

While municipalities across North America are debating taking action against door-to-door candy hunting, some families desperate to save their beloved holiday are taking drastic measures:

One Ohio man went viral after developing a “candy shoot” that would enable him to still give candy to the trick-or-treaters without getting within six feet of them.

Night time shot of the candy chute, complete with lights and sign! Thanks, everyone, for all the support! Edit: added a non-flash photo and a pic of the sign as well to get the full effect!

Posted by Andrew Beattie on Monday, September 14, 2020

Woodstock is the first municipality in Canada to cancel Halloween, but it is unlikely to be the last.

New Brunswick has only one active case of COVID-19, and has had 194 total cases since the beginning of the pandemic, after conducting over 68,000 tests. There is currently no one in hospital for the disease, and traffic into the province is heavily controlled.

Non-residents of Atlantic Canada are not permitted to enter New Brunswick for pleasure, and all business and family visitors from outside of Atlantic Canada must self-isolate for 14 days before being permitted to go out in public.