Second alleged Iranian agent faces deportation hearing in Canada

The IRB named Iranmanesh Majid as the second person with suspected ties to Tehran in as many weeks. Iran’s former deputy minister of the interior, Seyed Salman Samani, 42, is the first official to face the threat of deportation. 

Second alleged Iranian agent faces deportation hearing in Canada
Facebook/ Canadian Border Services Agency
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Canada has engaged in deportation proceedings for another alleged Iranian official living in Canada, according to the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). 

The IRB named Iranmanesh Majid as the second person with suspected ties to Tehran in as many weeks after receiving his case file on November 29.

Immigration spokesperson Anna Pape confirmed his admissibility proceedings will commence January 17, 2024, but fell short on providing details regarding the allegations. Iran’s former deputy minister of the interior, Seyed Salman Samani, 42, is the first official to face the threat of deportation. 

In November 2022, then-public safety minister Marco Mendicino designated Iran a "regime that has engaged in terrorism and systematic and gross human rights violations" under the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (IRPA).

That announcement made tens of thousands of Iranian officials and Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps members inadmissible to Canada, with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) denying entry to dozens of officials and their affiliates.

"When individuals have been involved in activity that would make them ineligible to be in this country, we’ll do everything we can to keep them out. And when they do get into this country, we’ll do everything we can to remove them," Defence Minister Bill Blair told reporters Wednesday.

"People who have no place in Canada will be removed," he said. "We need the cooperation of the community. We need information in order to deal effectively with these individuals."

Courtesy of tips from the public and referrals from Immigration Canada, CBSA is investigating 141 persons of interest with status in Canada. As of writing, nine officials are set to appear before the IRB to assess their admissibility into Canada. 

Outside of Samani and Majid, the identities of the other officials remain disclosed under the Privacy Act, reported Global News.

Of the other eight cases, CBSA told the publication they withdrew one case, as the person already left Canada, with another official facing an impending hearing. 

"The CBSA cannot comment on where any person may be residing, however, we can say that the CBSA only requests admissibility hearings for persons presently in Canada," said spokesperson Guillaume Bérubé.

Paperwork on the remaining cases is still being prepared before it is sent to the IRB, confirmed Pape.

Global learned that roughly 700 people in Canada have suspected ties to the Iranian regime with some allegedly threatening Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei's critics while in the country.

As of November 20, CBSA has denied 78 individuals entry into Canada following a review of roughly 17,800 visa applications for potential inadmissibility.

"I think any member of the IRGC that willingly served — not conscripts, but willingly served — should be kicked out of the country," said Kaveh Shahrooz, a human rights activist, lawyer and senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.

"But ultimately, it doesn't take away from our goal of making the entirety of the IRGC a terrorist organization," he added.

On November 14, a reporter asked Prime Minister Justin Trudeau if he would designate Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) as a terrorist organization, amid renewed calls by its critics. 

"We continue to watch and make sure we’re able to do everything we can that is responsible against the impact of the IRGC," he said.

The IRGC, the paramilitary organization backing Iran’s Supreme Leader, shot down Ukraine Airlines Flight 752 over Tehran on January 8, 2020, with two surface-to-air missiles. The strike killed all 176 people on board, including 55 Canadian citizens and 30 permanent residents upon impact.

On Samani, Shahrooz said it’s impossible to climb the ranks to deputy minister without being "loyal to the system."

"They see it as an easy country to get into, to bring their money and launder their money here," added the activist. "And frankly, I think it’s also because our officials are just not taking this issue as seriously as they should."

He called Canada a "safe haven" for regime members.

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