Trudeau unlikely to call snap election with European allies sent packing

'Whether we look at what's going on in France … whether we look at any democracy around the world, we are seeing … an erosion of democratic principles and rights,’ Prime Minister Justin Trudeau told reporters.

Trudeau unlikely to call snap election with European allies sent packing
The Canadian Press / Ethan Cairns
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Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called a snap election in 2021 during the COVID pandemic — a decision he is not expected to replicate in 2024.  

Speculation he would send voters back to the polls before the fixed October 2025 election date has reached a simmering boil of late, especially with the embarrassing by-election loss of a traditional Liberal strong-hold Toronto riding a few weeks ago.

Trudeau's 2021 snap election gamble failed to win most Canadians over, resulting in a slightly stronger Liberal minority mandate.

But unsuccessful snap election results from allies in France and the United Kingdom significantly deplete the chances of that happening again.

On Sunday, France President Emmanuel Macron bet on himself and failed.

Three days prior, Rishi Sunak’s Conservative Party faced a historic collapse in the polls. 

Initial projections show a coalition of left-wing parties in France would form a minority government, stymying the anti-immigration National Rally party.

Macron will remain president until 2027, but his new prime minister is widely expected to oppose many of Macron’s policies.

Sunak dissolved Parliament in late May. Then-Opposition Labour Party was 20 points ahead in the polls as of June.

Many are questioning why the Tories would set themselves on a path of imminent defeat.

Polls suggest the Trudeau government may meet the same fate after nine years in office. Few Canadian governments have maintained power much longer.

A reporter told the prime minister Wednesday that voters tend to give heads of state the door when their tenure nears a decade. 

“Why do you think you're different?” she asked. Trudeau replied: “There is a challenge faced by democracies all around the world right now.”

“Whether we look at what's going on in France … whether we look at any democracy around the world, we are seeing … an erosion of democratic principles and rights,” he added.

Trudeau claimed there are issues voters want his government to focus on now.

“This is a really important time for governments to step up and …deliver more childcare spaces, better access to dental care for people who don't have insurance, and more housing.”

Another reporter pointed out that members of the Liberal caucus are considering leaving.

Outgoing MP Ken Mcdonald urged party brass to put Trudeau’s leadership before a review amid low support for the party leader.

“If you do stay on, what's your reaction to that?” she asked. “I think the conversations that I'm having with MPs right across the country … are going to continue and we're going to stay focused on Canadians,” replied Trudeau.

“Are you willing to stay on and lose members of your caucus? the reporter asked. “I can't speak to what people in the media are thinking — that's your job — but I can speak to the strength and focus that all Liberals have on delivering for Canadians and that's what we're going to continue to do."

Trudeau and his ministers continue to face questions about the prospect of another Liberal government, which appears unlikely according to recent polls.

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