Trudeau's environment czar says all options still on the table in war against plastics

Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault said on Monday he does not know what the end result of negotiations will be, noting that countries like Kenya and Peru were asked to cut their plastic production by 40% on the last day of the plastics summit in Ottawa.

Trudeau's environment czar says all options still on the table in war against plastics
Alberto Gandolfo/LaPresse via AP
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Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault has clarified once again that all options to eliminate plastic waste are on the table in negotiations for a global plastic treaty.

This includes putting hard caps on the amount of plastic the world produces in the first place.

Guilbeault said on Monday that he does not know what the end result of the negotiations will be, noting that countries like Kenya and Peru were asked to cut their plastic production by 40% on the last day of the plastics summit in Ottawa, The Canadian Press reports.

Guilbeault was recently asked about plastics production and China, the largest producer of plastics in the world, though he was tight-lipped about the topic when asked by Rebel News' Ezra Levant.

“Hey, you're on the board of a Chinese agency, a Chinese government agency for the environment. How is that not a conflict of interest given that you're in the Canadian cabinet? Is that why you never criticized China? The world's largest producer of plastic?” he asked, to no response.

The China Council for International Cooperation on Environment and Development — chaired by a former chief of staff to Chinese General Secretary Xi Jinping— still lists Guilbeault as an “executive vice chairperson” on its website to this day.

After being tugged at by some of Guilbeault’s staff, Levant asked, “Why don't you ever criticize China? Have you received help from China in your political campaigns too? China refuses to sign the anti-plastics treaty. Why are you forcing that on Canadians?

While the Chinese environment minister said in 2022 that his country would combat plastic pollution, it, along with nations like India and Indonesia, refused to sign a pledge to “end the continued investment in unabated new coal-fired power plants, which is incompatible with efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C”.

Rebel News reporter Alexa Lavoie then questioned Guilbeault on the coming plastics registry, which Guilbeault announced on Monday.

“What is the cost [of] that organization and [what will the] taxpayer need to pay for your registry?” Lavoie asked, again to no answer.

Since 2022, Environment and Climate Change Canada has been working to establish a plastics registry, akin to its monitoring of greenhouse gas emissions.

“What we’re aiming to do with this registry is to ensure that there’s more transparency in Canada on the production and use of plastics,” Guilbeault said, according to The Canadian Press.

“It is hard to tackle a problem if you don’t know what it is, where it is, what’s being used,” he said.

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