What's a refugee? Denmark's prime minister lays down the facts

Unlike neighbouring Sweden, which has welcomed countless refugees from the Middle East and Africa, Denmark keeps its borders tightly shut.

What's a refugee? Denmark's prime minister lays down the facts
AP Photo/Andreea Alexandru
Remove Ads

Denmark’s Prime Minister Mette Frederiksen laid the facts down on the definition of being a refugee — making a point that many European countries appear to have forgotten with the massive influx of so-called “economic refugees” into Europe in recent years.

Speaking to the press after passing a law providing Ukrainian refugees the right to work, education and social welfare following their exodus from Ukraine amid the ongoing conflict with Russia, Frederiksen said that “being a refugee is temporary.”

“Being a refugee is temporary, so you have to return and help build up your homeland when you get the opportunity. It gives us the opportunity to help other refugees,” Frederiksen said.

Denmark remains one of the few countries in Europe to maintain stringent immigration policies to protect the local population from being supplanted by immigrants, who weigh down infrastructure incapable of supporting their needs, as well as those of locals.

Unlike neighbouring Sweden, which has welcomed countless refugees from the Middle East and Africa, Denmark keeps its borders tightly shut.

Denmark became the first European nation to demand that Syrian refugees who arrived during the 2015 migrant crisis go back home.

As detailed by Summit News, former immigration minister Inger Stojberg detailed the country’s approach to immigration when he wrote, “We might as well be honest about the fact that we would rather help Ukrainian refugees than Somalians and Palestinians.”

“No one dares to say it like it is: It’s because the Ukrainians are more like us and because they are primarily Christians,” he added.

Under Denmark’s strict anti-immigration policies, the country enacted a policy last year to ensure that no area of the country can host more than 30% of individuals from a non-Western background.

The move is designed to prevent Denmark from seeing the formation of no-go zones and ghettos, such as those in Paris and Malmö, where even first responders are prohibited from entering due to the danger posed by foreign nationals.

A study performed at the University of Copenhagen found that ethnic and cultural diversity has a negative impact on otherwise homogeneous communities, like Denmark. The study found that mass immigration and expanding ethnic diversity had a negative impact on community cohesion.

Swedish publication Samnyyt spoke to female Ukrainian refugees who said that they felt unsafe after being housed in hostels as refugees. The women were reportedly accosted by “unknown males of foreign origin” in the accommodations where the women were staying with their children and reported the incidents to police.

Remove Ads
Remove Ads

  • By Ezra Levant

Save Rebel News

Rebel News and Ezra Levant received legal notice of intention to bring a lawsuit from Trudeau’s “disinformation” czar Jean-Christophe Boucher. He’s coming to censor us and to shut us down — we need your help.

take action

Don't Get Censored

Big Tech is censoring us. Sign up so we can always stay in touch.

Remove Ads