Idaho governor signs executive order to prevent non-citizen voting

The Secretary of State will be tasked with reviewing voter rolls as part of the new election integrity measures.

Idaho governor signs executive order to prevent non-citizen voting
AP Photo/Kyle Green
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Idaho Governor Brad Little has signed an executive order aimed at ensuring only citizens can vote in the state's elections. The "Only Citizens Will Vote" Act, signed on Tuesday, directs Secretary of State Phil McGrane to work with county clerks to monitor voter rolls and prevent non-citizens from participating in elections.

Governor Little stated that while Idaho already has secure elections, the order is intended to maintain that security in light of ongoing immigration concerns at the southern border. "My executive order directs Secretary of State Phil McGrane to work with local county clerks to scrub our voter rolls and make sure Idaho's elections do not fall prey to the consequences of Biden's lawless open border," Little said in a statement, the Daily Wire reports.

Secretary McGrane expressed support for the order, emphasizing the state's commitment to election integrity. The executive order tasks McGrane with routinely reviewing voter rolls in coordination with state agencies and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to verify citizenship status.

The order also prohibits the state from providing voter registration materials to non-citizens or coordinating with federal programs to do so.

This state-level action comes as Rep. Chip Roy (R-TX) is pushing for federal legislation called the "Safeguard American Voter Eligibility" (SAVE) Act. Roy's proposed bill aims to enforce the prohibition of non-citizens voting in federal elections by requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration.

The Biden administration has expressed opposition to Roy's bill, stating that voting by non-citizens in federal elections is already illegal and punishable by prison, fines, and potential deportation. The administration argues that the justification for the bill is based on "easily disproven falsehoods."

As debates over election integrity and immigration continue, state and federal lawmakers are likely to remain focused on these issues in the lead-up to future elections.
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