Poland required to provide equal benefits to migrants under new EU doctrine

Illegal migrants in Poland are set to receive high-standard housing, social benefits, and health care — funded by Polish taxpayers — as part of compliance with European Union rules.

Poland required to provide equal benefits to migrants under new EU doctrine
AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski
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In accordance with a recent EU asylum directive issued on May 14, 2024, Poland will be obligated to provide social benefits and living conditions for migrants that are on par with those offered in Germany. 

The directive stipulates that illegal migrants will have the right to receive taxpayer-funded social benefits across all EU member states, including high-quality free housing, comprehensive free health care, social benefits, and access to the labor market for African and Arab migrants, Remix News reports.

Jacek Saryusz-Wolski, a politician from the Law and Justice (PiS) party, stated in an interview with wPolityce.pl that the directive aims to ensure equal benefits for migrants in all EU countries. In Germany, this equates to approximately €500 to €600 per month, covering food, housing and family reunification. 

According to Saryusz-Wolski, a family of four in Poland could receive around 10,000 zlotys (€2,300), significantly higher than the average Polish unemployment benefit of roughly 1,600 zlotys (€370) for six months. He stressed that Polish taxpayers would bear the cost of this new policy, as no EU funds are designated for this purpose.

Paweł Lisicki, editor-in-chief of the conservative Do Rzeczy weekly magazine, expressed his criticism of the directive during an interview with WNET radio.

He described it as absurd and attributed it to the dominant immigration ideology within the EU establishment. Lisicki highlighted the recent €200 million fine imposed on Hungary by the EU Court of Justice (ECJ) for failing to amend its immigration laws. He raised concerns that under Donald Tusk's left-liberal governance, Poland might fully adhere to these EU regulations, despite strong public opposition.

Lisicki also suggested that the media might portray this compliance as a success and an alignment with the European vanguard. 

He recounted the 2014 decision by the Civic Platform (PO) government to allow mass migration into Poland, breaking previous agreements within the Visegrád Group, the alliance between Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and Czechia.

Given the current EU pressures, he expresses doubt that the PO government would resist these directives, potentially shifting blame to predecessors or framing it as advantageous for Poland.

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