Too good to be true? Free movie/TV streaming devices come with Chinese malware

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Lawsuit update: you may recall the fascinating legal case involving Allarco, the owner of Super Channel, versus four retail store chains, namely Best Buy, Canada Computers, London Drugs and Staples. These are all established retail operations with good reputations. 

Except for one inconvenient truth: all of these businesses are selling piracy devices capable of streaming free TV and movies. And these devices only cost the consumer a few hundred bucks, although believe me, the profit margins are huge, especially given that profit margins for retail are typically razor-thin. That’s the stores’ motivation for selling these piracy devices, of course — the almighty buck, regardless of the fact that these devices are empowering illegal activity. Employees have even admitted to the illegality in conversations captured via hidden video. 

Now, maybe you don’t give a rodent’s rectum when it comes to ripping off content from “the man.” But this deal really is too good to be true. Because along with the free streaming, you get an unwanted “bonus”: namely, these made in China devices tend to be loaded with malware and spyware. So while you’re watching the next episode of The Oath free of charge, your personal information is being compromised by the mandarins in Beijing. It’s a deal with the devil: free content in exchange for your personal data. 

And so it is that in an Edmonton courtroom earlier this month, Allarco asked for an injunction that would prohibit the four major stores from selling these devious devices, at least until the judge renders his decision one way or the other. To date, that judge has yet to decide one way or another. And the trial is scheduled to resume today in Edmonton. Supposedly there will be an excess of legal wrangling, but a decision might be forthcoming.

Incidentally, we reached out to the four stores. All have declined comment. That’s okay. They aren’t obligated to answer journalists when it comes to their alleged nefarious business dealings. But they do have to answer to a judge. And we think the arguments that will be made in the days and weeks ahead regarding the merits of selling illicit piracy devices will prove more fascinating than anything found on any reality TV program...

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